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Going to Congress – 2017

Our Canadian Network of Humanitarian History will meet for the first time as an affiliated committee of the Canadian Historical Association  on May 29 2017 at Ryerson University.  Those interested can read our latest Bulletin.  This summer we are working at a virtual exhibit on humanitarian pictures of refugees.  The call for stories is open until the end of June 2017.

The Carleton University Disability  Research Group is bringing our brand new traveling exhibit on Educational Technologies for People Blind or Partially Sighted in Canada since 1860 to the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Disability Studies Association at Ryerson University, in Room SHE 560, room May 29 to June 2.   The virtual version of “Envisioning Technologies” will expand this summer, with panels on refugees, and on technologies for people who are deaf-blind.

Dimanche le 28 mai je rencontrerai mes collègues directeurs des 50 départements d’histoire du pays pour parler du merveilleux site web “Que faire avec un diplôme en histoire?” et des futurs possibles des études avancées.

On Monday May 29, I will be chairing a panel at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Historical Association entitled “« A passion for history »: A National Survey of the Education Experience of Undergraduate students” where I will also speak of the extraordinary group of second year majors in History to whom I taught his Winter.

And all through Congress, I will assist the Canadian Federation of Social Sciences and Humanities in my role as Board member for Associations for the last time in four years.  It has been an honour to serve in such good company.  I will spend a few hours at their kiosk at the fair and meet associations presidents and directors for breakfast.

The Third Bulletin of the Canadian Network of Humanitarian History is Out

The Third Newsletter of the CNHH was sent out to the membership and subscribers this morning. The full text of the bulletin can be read below. This update addresses new members and news from the membership, past and future events, publications, and conferences of the Network, and the future research projects and funding.

News from the Membership, Past and Future Events, Research Project and Funding.
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Dear Colleagues,Members:
Since the CNHH last Bulletin in May, two people have joined the network:

David Meren, Professor Adjoint, Université de Montréal – Drawing on cultural history, social history, and postcolonial studies, Dr. Meren explores the evolution of Canada and Quebec’s places in the world and how their international activities shaped and were shaped by the experiences of people living in the northern half of North America. In 2012, he published With Friends Like These: Entangled Nationalisms and the Canada-Québec-France Triangle, 1944-1970 (UBC Press), leading to the exploration of the concept of “nationhood” in an increasingly globalized world. He is currently co-editing a volume on Canadian international history from the perspective of race.

Deanne van Tol, Assistant Professor, Redeemer University – Interests: History of Humanitarianism, welfare, gender and empire in 20th century sub-Saharan Africa.

You may see the whole list here: http://aidhistory.ca/members/ Please continue to show the website to colleagues, partner organizations, archivists and students. Let us know when the information about your work posted on the members list needs to be updated.

News from members:
Marie-Luise Ermisch wrote in June: “I am currently working at the Canadian International Resources and Development Institute (CIRDI) as a program manager for their Mongolia file. The aim of my project is to work with Mongolians to improve communication around mining. I actually just came back from a field mission to Mongolia this Sunday. It’s such a fascinating place, undergoing a lot of historical change in a short period of time.” She has accepted to write a blog for the CNHH about her experience. “[…] A social media rep at Oxfam GB ask[ed] about my work on Oxfam. She wants to curate a social media campaign commemorating Operation Oasis, 50 years after the fact. Apparently she has my doctoral thesis printed and bound on her desk. It was a very nice surprise and demonstrates that the work we are doing is relevant. It also made me miss history.”

Sarah Glassford collaborated to the wonderful virtual exhibition “120 Years of the Canadian Red Cross” which was launched a few weeks ago. She is on her way to Adelaide for the conference on the “Histories of the Red Cross Movement: Continuity and Change” on September 9-11, for which she will act as the ambassador of the CNHH and write a blog on her return.

Jill Campbell Miller won an AMS Postdoctoral Fellowship (https://cshm-schm.ca/ams-announces-history-of-medicine-and-healthcare-post-doctoral-fellowship-and-grant-program/ )
– a one-year fellowship with a maximum stipend of $45,000 and a $2500 research and travel grant to support projects related to the history of health care, disease, medicine, or the education of health professionals. Her project will collect research regarding the history of Canadian participation in health-related humanitarian and development work in South and Southeast Asia between 1950 and 1968, with a particular focus on healthcare-related education and training programs.Events, past and future:
The third workshop of the network took place in Calgary, in the wake of Congress. You may read the account here, written by our Research Assistant for the occasion, Sandy Barron.
The recording of the panel on ““Aid, Advocacy, Development and Faith in the Digital Age” held by the CNHH at the Canadian Historical Association Meeting in June is now posted.The CNHH is collaborating with the Greg Donaghy, head of History Directorate of Global Affairs Canada, and David Webster, member of the CNHH at Bishop University, towards a Conference entitled ““A Samaritan State” Revisited: Historical Perspectives on Canadian Foreign Aid, 1950-2016” on December 12 and 13 2016, held in Ottawa on the Department’s premises. The program and registration information will be up soon on the CNHH website. For more information in the meantime, please contact Dominique Marshall (Dominique_marshall@carleton.ca). There will be a workshop ahead of the meeting on the archives of CIDA, and the CNHH is preparing a colleagues’ guide to their use, under the responsibility of Kevin Bruschett. Ahead of the meeting, the CNHH will also interview Keith Spicer, on the making of his book “A Samaritan State” half a century ago.

We plan at least one seminar in the months to come by fellow doctoral student Andrée-Anne Plourde, PhD candidate at Laval University, who researches the history of the youth Red Cross, during the years 1914-1945, in a comparative perspective (North America, South America and Europe), and has spent the summer in the archives of the Federation of Red Cross societies in Geneva. The specific information will be posted later. All can join, in person or virtually. Let us know ahead of time if you plan to come to Ottawa, so that we can welcome you for a talk about your work.

We also plan a call for papers early in 2017 for a special issue of the Journal of Canadian Studies for 2019, devoted to the history of humanitarian aid in Canada.

Please check the website for the many call for papers, events announcement, and send news our way, either by using the “Contact us” form on the website or by writing to Dominique Marshall. See for instance the CFP for the 100 years of the Mennonites Central Committee in 2020 in Winnipeg.

Research projects and funding:
A dedicated team of half a dozen members and colleagues will start a new application for a SSHRC Partnership Development Fund, for a project of collaborative research and teaching. Let us know if you would be interested to join the team. Our internal deadline is mid-October.

The CNHH is applying for a MITACS Accelerate fellowship together with the Latin America Working Group, the Match International Women’s Fund, CUSO International and Partnership Africa Canada, which will allow us to hire a graduate student for one term of full time work towards the histories of these four organizations.

The Migration and Diaspora Studies (Carleton University) funded project of a virtual exhibition on pictures of refugees in humanitarian aid will be on its way in the Fall. We will be hiring a research assistant and collect pictures from all partners.

We will try again to work with Carleton University funding for honours students, and with the Department of History’s third year “Practicum”, this time with Médecins du monde, in order to help with the organization of their archives and the preparation for their 20th anniversary. The experience of such work with Partnership Africa Canada last Spring has been encouraging. Their Communications Officer, Zuzia Danielsky, has contributed a blog to the CNHH which you can read here.

The website posts opportunities for funding, positions, and scholarships regularly. See, for instance, the open calls for scholarships/bursaries to visit the archives of Oxfam at the Bodleian Library regularly , and those of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) Archives in New York of in Jerusalem.

Website:
Nassisse Solomon contributed to the CNHH blog in May:1984: The Parable of Ethiopian Famine and Foreign Aid

Zuzia Daniesky wrote this month on “Partnership Africa Canada reaches into 30-years of archives with Carleton and CNHH

Please send news about publications, yours or other of interest, to be posted on the website’s “collective bibliography” or “recent publications”. Course materials will be posted in the “teaching” section. And news about archives in the section entitled “Questions of humanitarian archives”.Thanks to Carleton PhD candidate Sean Eedy, who will continue to be the webmaster for the Fall.

Sincerely,

Dominique Marshall

The First Newsletter of the Canadian Network of Humanitarian History is Out

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Welcome to the Canadian Network on Humanitarian History Newsletter

Dear colleagues of the Canadian Network on Humanitarian History,

It is my pleasure to announce the launch of the network’s website.  Please have a look at http://aidhistory.ca/ , and use the form “contact us” to send suggestions, events, blogs and images.  The site was the product of the reflection conducted in Ottawa last May during the second workshop of the network.  Three research assistants mentioned here then helped to put it together.  We hope that it is useful to you, your colleagues and students.  We have a rich list of blogs lined up for the coming six months, with places left if you are planning on sending one.  The latest was written by our current RA, Sean Eedy, on the time when Germans were refugees and not hosts.  Read it here.

Upcoming Events

The network’s third workshop will take place in Calgary after Congress, on Thursday June 2, from 8:30-5:00.  It will be free, but please register here.  We yet have to tell you in exactly which room of the University, but we have it booked together with catering, and a special event on the Wednesday evening before, when the Network was invited to introduce the conference of Romeo Dallaire, organized by our hosts in Calgary (more to come). It will be an occasion to plan future research and events, and to take store of existing projects.

The 2016 Canadian Historical Association Congress will be held May 29-June 1.  Members of the Network will be presenting paper at the “Aid, Advocacy, Development, and Faith in the Pre-Digital Age” panel (scheduling to be determined).

Ongoing Research

In the wake of last year’s Congress in Ottawa, historians, NGO workers and archivists volunteered to put together a SSHRC Partnership Development Grant to foster historical work with NGOs. The news of the competition will come in March. Whichever way this decision comes down, research is happening. At the moment, from the Network itself, Carleton honours students Eleanor Barney, is working as an undergraduate RA to provide the Partnership Africa Canada Communications Director, Zuzia Danielski, a report of the PAC’s history for use as part of their 30th anniversary plans.

The work of archival description of the 160 Match International boxes for Carleton Archives and Research Collections continues. This will help prepare for the activities of their upcoming anniversary. The network also helped to preserve archives and memories when the Canadian Hunger Foundation closed last fall. See the post on this here.

Since our last meeting the CNHH is richer of more than a dozen new members.  You can see the growing list here. If you don’t see your name, please send me a message through our website’s contact form, or by replying to this message.

Sincerely,

Dominique Marshall

You received this email because you signed up for membership with the Canadian Network on Humanitarian History (CNHH).  Should you wish to opt out of receiving this newsletter, updates and other information periodically sent by the CNHH, please follow the link and notify our staff that you would like to be removed from our mailing list.  http://aidhistory.ca/contact-us/
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Parution de mon article sur les participants Noirs à la Conférence sur l’enfance africaine de 1931

Usages de la notion de « droits des enfants » par les populations coloniales : la Conférence de l’enfance africaine de 1931

Écoutez l’entrevue sur l’article et la notion des droits de l’enfant donnée à l’émission 3600 secondes d’histoire, le 25 février 2016 à CHYZ, la radio des étudiants de l’Université Laval ICI.

RI_161_L204Résumé:  À la fin de juin 1931, douze hommes et femmes noirs venus de trois continents se rendirent à Genève pour une Conférence sur l’enfance africaine conviée par l’Union internationale de secours aux enfants. Les antécédents, les motivations et les termes des engagements respectifs de la douzaine de sujets des colonies ainsi que plus de 200 Occidentaux sont étudiés pour découvrir des sujets débouchant sur des impasses, des ententes, des différences reconnues, et de dresser le portrait des possibilités d’action que l’universalisme de l’entre-deux-guerres a pu offrir aux sujets coloniaux. En examinant les biographies ultérieures de ces participants, cet article tente d’évaluer l’impact qu’eut le nouveau discours des droits des enfants sur les pratiques et les identités du continent africain.

“Uses of the Notion of Children’s Rights by Colonial Populations: the Conference on African Children of 1931”

 Abstract: Towards the end of June 1931, twelve Black men and women from three continents came to Geneva for a Conference on African children organised by the Save the Children International Union. This study of the antecedents, the motivations and the terms of the respective commitments of this dozen of colonial subjects with more than two hundred western participants uncovers topics of agreement, deadlocks, and of acknowledgements of differences. It identifies the possibilities of actions offered by the language of universality to these Black participants and the people they represented. By examining their subsequent careers, this article also attempts at assessing the impact of the new discourse on the rights of children on practices and identities on the African continent.

Plan de l’article

  1. Invitations et hésitations : l’admission de « quelques rares africains »
  2. Les droits des enfants, idiome d’un réformisme libéral et colonial : « la délicate question de l’égalité raciale »
  3. Les droits des enfants à l’épreuve de la critique économique et politique des empires
  4. Itinéraires post-coloniaux du langage des droits des enfants : Addis Abeba, Kingston, Harlem, Londres et ailleurs
  5. Conclusion
  6. Remerciements
Introducing Uriel: Summer Student Joins Canadian Network for Humanitarian Aid

Hello!

My name is Carlos Uriel Contreras Flores, and I am Professor Dominique Marshall’s Research Assistant for this summer 2015. She has named me the main administrator for the Canadian Network on Humanitarian Aid’s website. After the “Second Canadian Workshop on the History of Humanitarian Aid”, which will take place at Carleton University in Ottawa this weekend, I will be creating a new site for the network according to the ideas, suggestions and preferences of its members.

uriel_with_minister

Me and the former Minister President of the Mexican Federal Electoral Institute, Luis Carlos Ugalde, at the Library Auditorium of the Tecnologico de Monterrey Puebla Campus on November 5 2013

I am a Mexican undergraduate student coming from Tecnologico de Monterrey Puebla Campus, and I study International Relations. During my undergraduate studies I have won prizes for literature works, been awarded several times as the best student on my bachelor degree, and been elected president of the International Relations Student Society. I was also the president of the organizing committee of the Simposio de Asuntos Internacionales y Politica Exterior (International Affairs and Foreign Policy Symposium) a major event held in Tecnologico de Monterrey Puebla Campus in 2013. Topics regarding international cooperation, the reform of the United Nations and the fight against human trafficking were part of the event. Several academic personalities, functionaries and politicians participated as speakers. You can find articles about it (in Spanish), like this one.

Uriel at Science Po Paris

Me at Sciences Po Paris

One of the topics that interest me the most is how development is promoted and achieved around the world, and how the international society organizes to bring humanitarian aid to the peoples that need it the most in times of crisis and catastrophes. This is why last year I took the course “Humanitarian aid and development” at Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Sciences-Po Paris) in my exchange semester.

While I was living in Paris I heard about the program the organization Mitacs Globalink offers to undergraduate students from around the world. This consists on Research Internships in dozens of Canadian universities; each Globalink Research Intern would assist a professor on a research project for twelve weeks during summer 2015.

Uriel and Friend

Me and a friend promoting a campaign for a NGO that takes care of children who live in the streets

I saw Professor Dominique Marshall’s project being offered and due to my interests in humanitarian aid, in the role of NGO’s like Oxfam (which fights inequities around the world and promotes development) and in XX century History, I decided to apply.  Some months later I was notified I had been accepted to this program.

Me and a friend promoting a campaign for a NGO that takes care of children who live in the streets

So now I am currently at Carleton University in Ottawa, and as I said before I will be managing the new website for the network, and will make contributions to the current website. If you have any particular suggestion for the website and its content do not hesitate to fill up a contact form or email me at cucf92@hotmail.com. I’m at your service.

Best wishes and enjoy what the Canadian Network on Humanitarian Aid’s website has to offer to you!

Read our tribute to the scholarly work of Bettina Bradbury, my doctoral supervisor, on the occasion of her retirement

Last June, four of Bettina’s former graduate students met at the Canadian Historical Association‘s Annual meeting the time of a roundtable about her work.  The oldest of them all, I spoke – in French – of the way she supervised my research in the late 1980s, and about supervision in general.  Labour/Le travail published our roundtable this week.  You may read our contributions here.

In addition, thanks to the tireless radio work of Sean Graham, Active History posted an audio recording of the roundtable last month, which included, at the end, Bettina’s own comments.

Some of these thoughts were about retirement, a topic about which the President of the American Historical Association, Jan Goldstein, wrote eloquently about in her October 2014 column of the AHA’s Bulletin, Perspectives on History, in generous ways that converged with Bettina’s.

Bettina is retiring shortly, and she gave a talk on her work at her university, York, last year, entitled “Twists, Turns and Tall Shoulders”

Her colleagues organized a symposium on her work last Winter, with a wonderful program. You can find the program here..

She also became a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada last year, and gave a shorter talk then.

On July 13: Launch of the Website on the History of the Wheelchair at Carleton’s Summit on Accessibility

The website is now available since July 13 at the following address: http://www.mobilityhistories.ca

We would be delighted if you could take a look at the exhibit and add your thoughts on how we can encourage interdisciplinary discussion of technology, mobility, and accessibility. Please feel free to forward this email to others who you feel would also be interested.

Our research assistant Dorothy Smith will present a poster and a talk on the project on the history of the wheelchair in Canada at the Accessibility Summit, from July 13 to July 15, 2014, at Ottawa’s Convention Centre.

Her  poster will be on display for the duration.

wheelchair poster jpg

The Wheelchair: An Artifact History of Disability in Canada

Carleton University’s virtual exhibit on wheelchair history in Canada asks the viewer to see the narratives created by medical and social models of disability as well as changes in technology, users, societal assumptions and behaviours over time. The goal is to encourage one to examine “intersectionalities” between people with disabilities, environmental, attitudinal, and technological change. As well, it seeks to while alert non-professionals to the ways disability is constructed out of impairment.

Her talk will be on July 13, at 2:45.

Session: World of Good Practices (Room: 206 + 208, level 2)

A fast paced, information packed session designed to share good practices and innovative approaches. Presenters will share their solutions to the challenges faced when creating greater accessibility and inclusion in the community, workplace, learning and living environments.

Retrofitting Cadboro Beach
Stefanie Barber (Canada)

Measure of Accessibility to Urban Infrastructure
Stephanie Gamache, Occupational Therapist, M.Sc., PH.D., Universite Laval (Canada)

Castle on a Hill:  Balancing accessibility with cultural landscape and natural environments
Dorota Grudniewicz, Project Manager Landscape Architect, National Capital Commission (Canada)

The Role of the Disability Community in Creating Social Change: The AODA Experience (media presentation)
David Lepofsky, University of Toronto (Canada)

The Wheelchair: An Artifact History of Disability in Canada

Dorothy-Jane Smith, Research Assistant, Carleton University (Canada)

Best Practices for Post-Production and Emerging Forms of Described Video
Robert Pearson, Director, Accessible Media Inc. (Canada)

The Development, Testing and Refinement of the School Accessibility Tool (SAT)
Nicole Yantzi, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Studies, Laurentian University (Canada)

A Person Centered and Social Capital Approach to Community Inclusion for People with Intellectual Disabilities
Keenan Wellar, Co-Leader and Director of Communications, LiveWorkPlay (Canada)

Background

I am helping to supervise the research on technologies of disability in Canada. Dorothy Smith is working on the history of the wheelchair in Canada, with the help of Design engineer Adrian Chan and Social Work Professor Roy Hanes.

We would like to recognize a major partner, Dr. David Pantalony, curator of Physical Sciences and Medicine at the Canada Science and Technology Museum. His support gave us access to the core artifacts found in the exhibit

As well, we thank the Carleton Centre for Public History who is hosting the exhibit on their website DH@CWorks (http://omeka.dhcworks.ca/exhibits/show/wheelchairhistorycanada).

Thanks also to Carleton University for funding this collaborative project through the CIF.

More on Disability Studies

I wrote a short review of the work done by historians of disability and the Canadian Disability Studies Association for the Bulletin of the Canadian Historical Association of May 2013: click HERE for versions in French and in English.

Carleton is starting its new minor in Disability Studies this September.  To learn more, click HERE

 

 

One Day Workshop on the History of Humanitarian Aid to Welcome Dr. Kevin O’Sullivan – July 9, 2014 at Carleton

 

Dr. Kevin O’Sullivan will be a visiting scholar at Carleton University from July 8 to August 4.  in Ottawa this coming July to research Canadian archives.  Kevin is the architect of the rich   http://nonstatehumanitarianism.com/ and the author of many studies of Irish humanitarianism.   He is researching countries of the Commonwealth.  (See a little more below)

We will start at 8:30 in the morning and finish at supper time.  There will probably be three distinct themes to be announced, in addition to a short presentation by Kevin on the state of affairs amongst his colleagues.

This will be an occasion to exchange concerns, findings, information about archives and documents, practices and projects, along a schedule that have yet to be determined depending on who will be able to come.

Will Tait and I will coordinate the day, and help you find the day, make sure that there is food for all during the day.  We do not have too much money, but do tell me if you would need assistance for your travel and accommodation.  We can also direct you to some hotels and Bed and breakfasts, and Will has offered to house two graduate students.

Exhibition of my students’ posters on the history of humanitarian aid, Carleton Library, Discovery Center, March 25 – April 15 2014

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Poster presentations, First session out of three, 25 March 2014, Discovery Center.  

The 45 students of HIST 3111 have researched topics as varied as missionaries in colonial Latin America to humanitarian aid and LGBTQ rights, and the Kindertransport.  Their posters will be on a rotating exhibition in Carleton University McOdrum Library’s Discovery Center (fourth floor)  for the coming three weeks. Thanks to Ashleigh Fleicher of the Discovery Centre  and Ingrid Draayer, exhibition specialist at the Library, for their assistance.

display P1010960

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rolling poster exhibition, second week, April 1-8 2014  (photo Ingrid Draayer)

My Course on the history of humanitarian aid starts today

hist3111

This course surveys the history of humanitarian agencies from their missionary and anti-slavery ancestors to the present times.  It teaches students the vocabulary useful for the understanding of humanitarianism. It introduces them to the historiography of the subject, the debates, approaches, explanations and interpretations of the major scholars, and the documents they use to write this history.  It presents the main events, the actors, ideas, institutions, and questions. It helps make sense of the current situation of humanitarian aid, which is complex and controversial, and which represents an increasingly large domain of social life and public action.

See outline